Reblog:The Season of ‘No’

Wonderful spiritual lesson by another Christian momma raising a toddler. My little one is only 9-month-old but I am already using the words, “Don’t” and “no”. One major take-away from this article is that God doesn’t keep things from us, He keeps them for us. This is why patience is important in our walk with God, parenting and doing life. Jess encourages us to accept the fact that some prayers we tag ‘unanswered’ or ‘NO’ from God may be for our good. Personally, the beauty of every NO is that they challenge me to seek God’s best in every situation. Enjoy this short article and be blessed!

“We don’t swim in the toilet!” No.

“Don’t feed your breakfast to the dog!” No.

“Don’t eat MY breakfast!” No.

“Don’t pee on the floor!” No.

Whew! You guessed it: these are some commonly overheard phrases in my home. Life with a toddler- what a season! Some days I feel like all I do is utter the word ‘no’ to her in one way or another. It’s a frustration to constantly speak it, but I can, in fact, accurately imagine that it’s frustrating to be on the receiving end of that word as well.

But why do I tell her no, or forbid her from doing things? Is it because I’m a big ol’ bully who just wants to be boss? Of course not. I don’t let her splash in the toilet because, germs. I don’t let her feed the dog because she needs the fuel herself. I don’t let…

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A Quick Fix or a Worth the Wait Blessing?

Most times the story of Esau and Jacob is often told to emphasize the deceptive nature of Jacob. There is often little or no emphasis on the role Esau played in losing his birth right. Alicia, the author of this article highlights the role Esau played in the loss of his birth right. The author uses real life experiences with her children to help us understand the dangers/consequences of instant gratification as seen in the story of Esau and Jacob. Enjoy!

For His Purpose

I’m assuming my kids are no different and share a common enthusiasm with other like-minded boys and girls—the electronic obsession!!??

These kids of mine would eat, drink, and sleep electronics if my husband and I allowed it, but thankfully for the sake of healthy living we’ve put a cap on their amount of exposure.

As a family we circled up in the living room about a year ago to hash out a plan or schedule for electronic time. That might sound over the top, but seriously it was necessary and has actually been pretty beneficial.

Here’s what we came up with: My kids love cereal (almost as much as electronics) and would prefer it for every meal. I’m not a fan; there can’t possibly be much nutritional value to a morsel of puffed up air, coated with sugar. Soooo, collectively, we determined cereal mornings would be limited to three mornings…

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Christian parents (especially mothers), your kid is a sinner

I agree with this author. Mommas tend to believe their children are perfect and can do no wrong. Parents often find themselves in denial and pain when their children make life-changing mistakes such as unplanned pregnancy and addictions. This Reblogged article by a former youth/teen pastor teaches mommas and parents how to face reality and deal with sin in their children’s life. According to the author, “Christian parents are the most challenging to relate to because they are so blinded by their own spiritual experiences and jargon”. How true is this?!

Enjoy!

SCHULTER ETYANG

© November 6, 2018 | Schulter Etyang

I’ve been fortunate enough to associate well with older and younger people alike. Throughout the years, I’ve been privileged to lend an ear to parents and to their children within the same family. I get to hear both sides of the story. This happens often in spite of the fact that I have no children of my own. The same is true with Jenny.

A father or mother would inform me what they think is wrong with their child, and when I listen to the child, the child gives me a different view of the same situation. Sometimes, those views are as varied as chalk and cheese. 

Many children who come from families where the parents are Christians find it very difficult to relate to their parents. Christian parents are the most challenging to relate to because they are so blinded by their own spiritual experiences…

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